Person: Philippos Glykon son of Asklepiades from Pergamon (Mysia)

Record ID: 47
Name: Philippos Glykon
Father's Name: Asklepiades
Place of Origin: Pergamon (Mysia)
Date Range: -40 to -10
List of Festivals:
Aktia in Nikopolis (Epeiros)
Isthmia in Isthmia (Corinthia)
Nemea in Argos (Argeia)
Olympia in Olympia (Elis)
Pythia in Delphi (Phokis)
List of Events:
Nemea inArgos (Argeia) on ( -40 to -10 )
Nemea inArgos (Argeia) on ( -40 to -10 )
Aktia inNikopolis (Epeiros) on ( -40 to -10 )
Aktia inNikopolis (Epeiros) on ( -40 to -10 )
Pythia inDelphi (Phokis) on ( -40 to -10 )
Pythia inDelphi (Phokis) on ( -40 to -10 )
Olympia inOlympia (Elis) on ( -40 to -10 )
Olympia inOlympia (Elis) on ( -40 to -10 )
Isthmia inIsthmia (Corinthia) on ( -40 to -10 )
List of Disciplines:
combat sports: pankration - paides
combat sports: pankration - andres
combat sports: pugme - andres
combat sports: pugme - ___
List of References:
AP 7.692
Hor. Ep. 1.1.30
IGRR IV 497 = IAG 58 = I.Pergamon 535 = SEG 14.764
SEG 29.1267
List of Prosopographies:
Moretti (1957), no. 725
LGPN V5a-20988
Farrington (2012), no. 1.105
Weir (2004), p. 128
Weir (2004), p. 128
Strasser (2001), no. 144
Sarikakis (1965), no. 38
Knab (1934), no. 34
Comment: Date range is taken from Farrington (2012), note 365, with reference to Moretti (1957), no. 725 who in turn references Horace who mentions Philippos Glykon in the first book of his Epistulae (1.1.30). The date is also determined by an epigram featuring Philippos Glykon, to wit Anth. Gr. 7.692, which mentions the athlete's death. Horace's reference and the estimated career of the epigrammatist Antipater of Thessalonike together lead to the estimate of Philippos Glykon's career between 40 and 10 B.C. The place of origin is also taken from Farrington, who refers to Anth. Gr. 7.692, the funeral epigram of Glykon. In the inscription it is said, beside the named victories, Glykon also won in the other 'sacred (and) crown games in Asia, Italia and Hellas.' - PK SEG 29.1267 presents an epitaph of a certain Glykon and Asklepiades dating to the 1st century BC. They might be the same as our Glykon and Asklepiades. [DvdL]